Gynecomastia, or abnormal enlargement of one or both nipples in boys or men is a condition that may affect individuals in different age groups. Excessive growth of the nipple due to various types of ailments that may accompany it, causes that an increasing number of patients are seeking specialist medical help that may help in diagnosis, determination of causes and treatment of this type of disorders.

Gynecomastia is called non-neoplastic glandular adenocarcinoma, which may be accompanied by excessive development of connective and adipose tissue. The increase in the volume of the nipple causes that patients suffering from gynecomastia may complain of pain and swelling of this area of ??the body. Other, additionally found, local or systemic disorders are often associated with the cause that is responsible for the development of gynecomastia .

There are many causes and mechanisms that may lead to the development of gynecomastia, with hormonal disorders being the major part of all cases.

What are the risk factors for the development of gynecomastia

In some periods of individual development, boys and men may develop the so-called physiological gynecomastia . It is often found during adolescence, when hormonal imbalances occur and the relative estradiol to testosterone ratio increases. Other periods of life associated with an increased incidence of gynecomastia and hormonal imbalances include early childhood and old age.

Some liver diseases, such as cirrhosis of the liver, in the course of which metabolism and detoxification of chemical compounds occur, make the decomposition of estrogens significantly slowed down. Excess and abnormal intercourse of female sex hormones to men may result in an excessive degree of glandular adenocarcinoma in males.

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